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Magnifissance

Creativity Reclaimed With Hermès ‘petit h’

Salvaged scraps become stylish treasures in Hermès’ petit h

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The mantra of reuse and upcycle has never been as relevant as it is at the moment—and you would be hard-pressed to find an iteration of it more adorable than the cheery creations of the specialty line from Hermès, “petit h.”

With its online collection just launched in Canada, petit h has been in the works at Hermès since 2010. Based on the premise of playfulness and free creativity, unconstrained by preconceived notions, the carefully curated collections feature whimsical, inspired objects crafted from leftover or salvaged materials at the Hermès design studios.

In the Hermès petit h workshops in Pantin, France, designers unleash their creative genius to transform leather scraps, fabric cuttings, or imperfect metals into flights of playful fancy—from jewellery to small leather goods, home accents, and accessories.

In the hands of skilled artisans, a bit of discarded blue calfskin emerges as a sweet charm of a dalmatian; cords of silk twill wrap around the wrist in a layered bracelet; and dainty porcelain teacups become eclectic candleholders.

hermes petit h
Dalmatian charm in calfskin with 100 percent silk twill cord.
hermes petit h
Silk bracelet. Each petit h piece is unique: the type of leather used may vary, so the colours of your product will be a surprise.

The designs don’t start off as formed product ideas; rather, in a process that Hermès dubs “creation in reverse,” petit h looks to the material to inform its transformation to an object. In a celebration of Hermès’ immense legacy, it’s a tribute to the artists, materials, and memories made over the years.

Petit h is unveiled to the public through a series of pop-up shops in Hermès boutiques around the world, featuring limited-edition collections. Current displays include a colourful equestrian setup at Faubourg Saint-Honoré, and an aerial, moving structure scene in Taipei.

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